The Bible Study Project is doing another neat thing

In the last few weeks, the coronavirus pandemic has disrupted our entire world. For most of us, this means we can’t gather with our local church community. Below you’ll find one of our videos, suggested Scripture readings, and some discussion questions to use for yourself or with family and friends.

— Read on go.jointhebibleproject.com/webmail/296292/423155287/4ef3069ca99cf97685cf8eb0a7fd76fba627c5d3cf8e88c2be4c67725c322b4e

If you are not familiar with TBP, now is a good time.

Christians do not use other people—Christian or not—for their own use, advantage, or pleasure. Being a Christian brings with it serious responsibilities.

Review of High Definition Commentary: Galatians – Brent Niedergall

Every Sunday, more preachers than we would like to think stand behind pulpits and incorrectly explain various features of the Greek language in the New Testament. Grammatical misunderstandings of the aorist tense form and the present active imperative have been carefully passed down from generation to generation along with lexical misconceptions of words like ἀγαπάω and ἐκκλησία. Bible-believing, orthodox preachers, who love God are feeding their congregation linguistic lies out of an ignorance of the Greek language. That’s too bad. But it’s also too bad that where a knowledge of biblical Greek can actually bring so much to the table in our preaching and teaching, it is often ignored. Steve Runge has done preachers and teachers a great service by writing High Definition Commentary: Galatians, a resource that uses Greek correctly so preachers and teachers can improve what they’re bringing to the table when feeding their congregations. 
— Read on niedergall.com/review-of-high-definition-commentary-galatians/

The pestilence that stalks in darkness: aefenglommung

Cat Stevens (now, Yusuf Islam) said a few years ago of his song, “Moonshadow,” that its inspiration was a happy trip to Spain as a young man. Away from city lights, he delighted in a bright moon that cast his shadow on the ground. But songs acquire myths to explain them when the artist does not. The tale going around when I was in college (and this song was new) was that Stevens had been very ill with some disease (rumored to be tuberculosis) and he was living with the fear of its return.
— Read on aefenglommung.livejournal.com/1627486.html

I appreciate the folks who are trying to keep baseball news flowing, but I find it hard to maintain interest. I care about the game, not the biz.